Garden Isle Mint Technical Sheet


Naikela Botanicals’ superfood tea powders are an effective way to deliver water-soluble nutrients into your body to improve your overall health and wellness. The tea blends are formulated to provide specific lifestyle benefits. Each tea delivers a host of health benefits and can be mixed with water or paired as a complement to various foods. Farmed and harvested on Kauai, these botanicals are Certified Naturally Grown (no pesticides are used during the growing process, non-GMO), hand-harvested, and dried via a solar drying process that maximizes the nutrient content. 

Garden Isle Mint

Key Features & Benefits:

· Contains adaptogens and antioxidants*

· Supports nervous system function*

· Promotes healthy immune function*

Garden Isle Mint contains many calming botanicals (shiso, lemon verbena, lemon balm, Artemisia, and pineapple sage) that may help improve nervous system function. More specifically, studies have shown that these ingredients can help with muscle spasms, seizures, muscle recovery from sports, anxiety, and depression. This tea blend also contains powerful antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory ingredients to help boost overall health and wellness. The tarragon and pineapple sage have blood pressure-lowering properties, and several of the botanicals promote healthy digestion. Additional information about the specific ingredients is detailed below.*

· Spearmint contains phenols and works as an antioxidant. It also has antibacterial and anti-carcinogenic properties.*

 

· Tulsi has adaptogenic properties: it helps the body adapt to stress. It also has antibacterial properties. In Ayurvedic medicine, it is used to promote longevity.*

 

· Shiso (Perilla frutescens) has prokinetic, antispasmodic, and anti-inflammatory effects. Results from a 2014 clinical trial demonstrated that consumption of shiso extract has a positive effect on symptoms of gastrointestinal discomfort, including bloating, gas, rumbling, fullness, and abdominal discomfort.*

 

· Lemon verbena (Lippia citriodora) has been shown to decrease inflammation in patients who have multiple sclerosis; it has anti-inflammatory properties and also acts as a potent antioxidant. In a laboratory study, it was shown to protect blood cells against oxidative damage. Furthermore, lemon verbena is used in Iranian traditional medicine for seizure disorders, and 2016 study showed that it has anticonvulsant effects. In 2018, a study demonstrating the effects of lemon verbena on sports injury recovery was published; participants who were given lemon verbena had less muscle damage and a faster recovery following exhaustive exercise.*

 

· Lemon balm contains terpenes and tannins that have antiviral effects; these antiviral effects may help heal cold sores. It also contains eugenol, which can help calm muscle spasms and kill bacteria. Additionally, lemon balm is used to help with insomnia, anxiety, indigestion, gas, and bloating.*

 

· Anise hyssop is a member of the mint family; it contains limonene, which helps to neutralize stomach acid and promote healthy digestive function.*

 

· Peppermint has antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties; it also has antispasmodic effects, which help calm the gastrointestinal tract. In addition, it has significant antioxidant activity.*

 

· Artemisia contains flavonoids, essential oils, and artemisinin; it has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for many years. In Western medicine, artemisinin is used in combination therapies for treatment of drug-resistant malaria. Artemisia has even broader antiparasitic potential, and recent studies have revealed its application as an anti-cancer agent. Human and animal studies have also substantiated its use as a potential anti-diabetic therapy. Traditionally, Artemisia is also used to help with painful menstruation, digestive irregularity, asthma, neurologic disorders (e.g., anxiety and epilepsy), and kidney problems, among other conditions.*

 

· Tarragon (Artemisia dracunculus) is an herb used in cooking and for medicinal purposes; it has been found to have potent anti-cancer effects. A study was conducted on patients who have pre-diabetes; tarragon was shown to lower blood pressure and A1C (a measure of blood sugar level) and raise levels of good cholesterol (HDL).*

 

· Pineapple sage (Salvia elegans) has been shown to have anti-hypertensive (blood pressure-lowering) effects; additionally, lab studies have demonstrated its use as anti-anxiety and antidepressant.*

 

· Stevia is a no-calorie sweetener that is beneficial for people who have diabetes, those looking to maintain a healthy weight, and children. It has been used for centuries to help lower blood sugar.*

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.

 


 

References for Garden Isle Mint:

Bionity.com. Ocimum tenuiflorum. http://www.bionity.com/en/encyclopedia/Ocimum_tenuiflorum.html. Accessed March 6, 2018. 

Buchwald-Werner S, Fujii H, Reule C, Schoen C. Perilla extract improves gastrointestinal discomfort in a randomized placebo controlled double blind human pilot study. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2014 May 27;14:173.

Buchwald-Werner S, Naka I, Wilhelm M, Schütz E, Schoen C, Reule C. Effects of lemon verbena extract (Recoverben®) supplementation on muscle strength and recovery after exhaustive exercise: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2018 Jan 23;15:5.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide: University of Maryland Medical Center. Lemon balm. https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/lemon-balm. Accessed March 6, 2018.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide: University of Maryland Medical Center. Peppermint. https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/peppermint. Accessed March 6, 2018.

Ghazanfar K, Ganai BA, Akbar S, Mubashir K, Dar SA, Dar MY, Tantry MA. Antidiabetic activity of Artemisia amygdalina Decne in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:185676.

Goyal SK, Samsher, Goyal RK. Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) a bio-sweetener: a review. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Feb;61(1):1-10.

HerbalResource. Mugwort. https://www.herbal-supplement-resource.com/mugwort-herb.html. Accessed March 20, 2018.

Hong L, Ying SH. Ethanol extract and isolated constituents from artemisia dracunculus inhibit esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and induce apoptotic cell death. Drug Res (Stuttg). 2015 Feb;65(2):101-6.

Jiménez-Ferrer E1, Badillo FH, González-Cortazar M, Tortoriello J, Herrera-Ruiz M. Antihypertensive activity of Salvia elegans Vahl. (Lamiaceae): ACE inhibition and angiotensin II antagonism. J Ethnopharmacol. 2010 Jul 20;130(2):340-6.

Krishna S, Bustamante L, Haynes RK, Staines HM. Artemisinins: their growing importance in medicine. Trends Pharmacol Sci. 2008 Oct;29(10):520-7.

Mauriz E, Vallejo D, Tuñón MJ, Rodriguez-López JM, Rodríguez-Pérez R, Sanz-Gómez J, García-Fernández Mdel C. Effects of dietary supplementation with lemon verbena extracts on serum inflammatory markers of multiple sclerosis patients. Nutr Hosp. 2014 Nov 4;31(2):764-71.

Méndez-Del Villar M, Puebla-Pérez AM, Sánchez-Peña MJ, González-Ortiz LJ, Martínez-Abundis E, González-Ortiz M. Effect of Artemisia dracunculus Administration on Glycemic Control, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance. J Med Food. 2016 May;19(5):481-5.

Mora S, Millán R, Lungenstrass H, Díaz-Véliz G, Morán JA, Herrera-Ruiz M, Tortoriello J. The hydroalcoholic extract of Salvia elegans induces anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects in rats. J Ethnopharmacol. 2006 Jun 15;106(1):76-81.

Quirantes-Piné R, Herranz-López M, Funes L, Borrás-Linares I, Micol V, Segura-Carretero A, Fernández-Gutiérrez A. Phenylpropanoids and their metabolites are the major compounds responsible for blood-cell protection against oxidative stress after administration of Lippia citriodora in rats. Phytomedicine. 2013 Sep 15;20(12):1112-8.

Rashidian A, Farhang F, Vahedi H, Dehpour AR, Ejtemai Mehr S, Mehrzadi S, Rezayat SM. Anticonvulsant Effects of Lippia citriodora (Verbenaceae) Leaves Ethanolic Extract in Mice: Role of GABAergic System. Int J Prev Med. 2016 Jul 29;7:97.

SFGate. What is hyssop tea good for? http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/hyssop-tea-good-for-7547.html. Accessed March 20, 2018.

Sun X, Sun H, Zhang J, Ji X. Artemisia Extract Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus by Up-Regulating Adiponectin. J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 Dec;56(12):1550-1554.

Tapsell LC, Hemphill I, Cobiac L, Patch CS, Sullivan DR, Fenech M, Roodenrys S, Keogh JB, Clifton PM, Williams PG, Fazio VA, Inge KE. Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future. Med J Aust. 2006 Aug 21;185(4 Suppl):S4-24.