Aloha Chai  Technical Sheet


 

Naikela Botanicals’ superfood tea powders are an effective way to deliver water-soluble nutrients into your body to improve your overall health and wellness. The tea blends are formulated to provide specific lifestyle benefits. Each tea delivers a host of health benefits and can be mixed with water or paired as a complement to various foods. Farmed and harvested on Kauai, these botanicals are Certified Naturally Grown (no pesticides are used during the growing process, non-GMO), hand-harvested, and dried via a solar drying process that maximizes the nutrient content. 

Aloha Chai

Key Features & Benefits:

· Contains antioxidants and adaptogens*

· Helps with hormone regulation*

· Promotes cardiovascular and digestive health*

Aloha Chai is a sweet and spicy tea blend, full of adaptogens and antioxidants to help the body cope with daily stresses and normalize bodily processes. This blend contains ashwagandha, which promotes hormone balance and healthy cardiovascular function. For cholesterol regulation and gastrointestinal protection, ginger and cardamom are included. Turmeric, allspice, and clove may alleviate digestive symptoms, and laboratory studies have demonstrated the anti-cancer effects of numerous botanicals in Aloha Chai. Additional information about the specific ingredients is detailed below.*

· Tulsi has adaptogenic properties: it helps the body adapt to stress. It also has antibacterial properties. In Ayurvedic medicine, it is used to promote longevity.*

 

· Ginger has immune-modulating, anti-tumorigenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, anti-hyperglycemic, anti-lipidemic, and anti-emetic properties. It may be helpful for nausea, arthritis, muscle aches, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and a host of other conditions. Ginger is also a potent antioxidant. A 2001 study demonstrated that in patients with osteoarthritis, ginger was more effective at reducing knee pain than the placebo.*

 

· Allspice has anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antifungal, and antioxidant properties; additionally, it may alleviate digestive symptoms such as diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, constipation, bloating, and gas.*

 

· Lemongrass has anticarcinogenic effects.*

 

· Turmeric has antioxidant, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties. It is an extremely versatile plant that has been used in both Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine for over 4,000 years. Turmeric acts a powerful anti-inflammatory that has been used to improve digestion, support liver health, alleviate skin problems, and aid in wound healing, among other conditions. Curcumin is a component of turmeric, and research has shown that curcumin has potent antioxidant properties. These antioxidants protect cells from free radical damage, and preliminary studies show that turmeric has anti-cancer properties.*

 

· Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) is an adaptogenic herb that is used in Ayurvedic, Indian, Unani, and traditional African medicine. It has stress-reducing, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-aging, and hormone-balancing properties. Ashwagandha may also help with blood pressure and cholesterol regulation.*

 

· Cardamom is a versatile spice that offers many health benefits, including gastrointestinal protection, cholesterol moderation, cardiovascular protection, and enhanced blood circulation. It also acts as an antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, anti-asthmatic, and antispasmodic.*

 

· Clove is an herb that stimulates the secretion of digestive enzymes and has a positive effect on digestion. It may also help with nausea, dyspepsia, and gas. Furthermore, it has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, immune-boosting, chemo-preventive, and liver-protective properties. Clove has been shown to help with insulin control and osteoporosis prevention.*

 

· Stevia is a no-calorie sweetener that is beneficial for people who have diabetes, those looking to maintain a healthy weight, and children. It has been used for centuries to help lower blood sugar.*

 

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent disease.

 


 

References for Aloha Chai:

Ali BH, Blunden G, Tanira MO, Nemmar A. Some phytochemical, pharmacological and toxicological properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe): a review of recent research. Food Chem Toxicol. 2008;46(2):409-20.

Altman RD, Marcussen KC. Effects of a ginger extract on knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum. 2001;44(11):2531-2538.

Bionity.com. Ocimum tenuiflorum. http://www.bionity.com/en/encyclopedia/Ocimum_tenuiflorum.html. Accessed March 6, 2018.

Complementary and Alternative Medicine Guide: University of Maryland Medical Center. Turmeric. https://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/turmeric. Accessed March 6, 2018.

Goyal SK, Samsher, Goyal RK. Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana) a bio-sweetener: a review. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2010 Feb;61(1):1-10.

Karmakar S, Choudhury M, Das AS, Maiti A, Majumdar S, Mitra C. Clove (Syzygium aromaticum Linn) extract rich in eugenol and eugenol derivatives shows bone-preserving efficacy. Nat Prod Res. 2012;26(6):500-9.

OrganicFacts. Allspice. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/allspice.html. Accessed March 6, 2018.

OrganicFacts. Cardamom. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-cardamom.html. Accessed March 6, 2018.

OrganicFacts. Clove. https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/health-benefits-of-cloves.html. Accessed March 6, 2018.

Prasad RC, Herzog B, Boone B, Sims L, Waltner-Law M. An extract of Syzygium aromaticum represses genes encoding hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes. J Ethnopharmacol. 2005 Jan 4;96(1-2):295-301.

Tapsell LC, Hemphill I, Cobiac L, Patch CS, Sullivan DR, Fenech M, Roodenrys S, Keogh JB, Clifton PM, Williams PG, Fazio VA, Inge KE. Health benefits of herbs and spices: the past, the present, the future. Med J Aust. 2006 Aug 21;185(4 Suppl):S4-24.

WebMD. Ashwagandha. https://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-953-ASHWAGANDHA.aspx. Accessed March 6, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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